September 20, 2014   31 notes
Ambush and counter-ambush in a Dark Future diorama.  (White Dwarf magazine No. 110, Games Workshop, February 1989.)

Ambush and counter-ambush in a Dark Future diorama.  (White Dwarf magazine No. 110, Games Workshop, February 1989.)

September 20, 2014   30 notes
A dispute over right-of-way in the Dark Future.  (Dave Andrews, “Dark Future Tournament Rules”, Games Workshop.)

A dispute over right-of-way in the Dark Future.  (Dave Andrews, “Dark Future Tournament Rules”, Games Workshop.)

September 19, 2014   142 notes
David Sutherland’s complete cover art for the AD&D Monster Manual, TSR, 1977.  (Image via The Acaeum.)

David Sutherland’s complete cover art for the AD&D Monster Manual, TSR, 1977.  (Image via The Acaeum.)

September 18, 2014   29 notes
Magic and steel vs dragon fire.  (Ad for the Silverdawn PBM game by Entertainment Concepts Inc., Dragon magazine No 83, March 1984.  Signature seems to say Kim J Alderman, or similar.)  Silverdawn promised a $5000 prize to one quest winner.

Magic and steel vs dragon fire.  (Ad for the Silverdawn PBM game by Entertainment Concepts Inc., Dragon magazine No 83, March 1984.  Signature seems to say Kim J Alderman, or similar.)  Silverdawn promised a $5000 prize to one quest winner.

September 17, 2014   78 notes
Knights of the Flanaess ride forth to do battle.  (Jeff Easley, cover of A Guide to the World of Greyhawk by Gary Gygax, from the World of Greyhawk boxed set, TSR, 1983.)

Knights of the Flanaess ride forth to do battle.  (Jeff Easley, cover of A Guide to the World of Greyhawk by Gary Gygax, from the World of Greyhawk boxed set, TSR, 1983.)

September 16, 2014   47 notes
Locate Object, 3rd level cleric spell.  Potentially very useful for the party, but many high-level or wealthy beings will learn to use lead-lined storage chests.  (David Sutherland from the AD&D Players Handbook, TSR, 1978.)

Locate Object, 3rd level cleric spell.  Potentially very useful for the party, but many high-level or wealthy beings will learn to use lead-lined storage chests.  (David Sutherland from the AD&D Players Handbook, TSR, 1978.)

September 15, 2014   51 notes
Edrie selects an arrow.  (Keith Parkinson, from James M Ward’s “Encounters” adventure in Polyhedron No. 15, TSR/RPGA, 1983.)

Edrie selects an arrow.  (Keith Parkinson, from James M Ward’s “Encounters” adventure in Polyhedron No. 15, TSR/RPGA, 1983.)

September 15, 2014   15 notes
Edrie lays claim to the treasure of the wizard’s tomb.  (Keith Parkinson cover for Polyhedron No. 15, TSR/RPGA, 1983.) [[MORE]]
In 1983 the RPGA held a contest to reward those who recruited the most new members, with top prizes including GenCon tickets and a seat at Gary Gygax’s table.  They also had staff artists draw the winners’ favorite characters, featured them on Polyhedron covers, and published two-page D&D adventures written around them.  Second-place winner Randy Solo provided the stats for Edrie Solo, 8th level fighter.

Edrie lays claim to the treasure of the wizard’s tomb.  (Keith Parkinson cover for Polyhedron No. 15, TSR/RPGA, 1983.) 

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September 14, 2014   83 notes
While the surviving crew of a crashed Federation survey ship waits for rescue and deals with mutineers, the people of Blackmoor try to make sense of the sudden appearance of “The “City of the Gods” and its magical flying eggs.  (Doug Chaffee cover for D&D Expert module DA3: City of the Gods by Dave Arneson and David Ritchie, TSR, 1987, based on locations and events in Arneson’s original Blackmoor campaign.)

While the surviving crew of a crashed Federation survey ship waits for rescue and deals with mutineers, the people of Blackmoor try to make sense of the sudden appearance of “The “City of the Gods” and its magical flying eggs.  (Doug Chaffee cover for D&D Expert module DA3: City of the Gods by Dave Arneson and David Ritchie, TSR, 1987, based on locations and events in Arneson’s original Blackmoor campaign.)

September 13, 2014   176 notes
The party battles giant killer frogs with their crossbow, magic sword, and laser rifle and pistol.  (Denis Beauvais, credited as Dennis, from D&D Expert module DA2: Temple of the Frog by Dave Arneson and David Ritchie, TSR, 1986.)  The temple part of this adventure is adapted directly from the sample dungeon included in D&D Supplement II: Blackmoor in 1975, the first adventure ever published for an RPG, set in the first campaign world specifically created for a fantasy RPG.  Sci fi elements from other worlds were a part of D&D from the very beginning.

The party battles giant killer frogs with their crossbow, magic sword, and laser rifle and pistol.  (Denis Beauvais, credited as Dennis, from D&D Expert module DA2: Temple of the Frog by Dave Arneson and David Ritchie, TSR, 1986.)  The temple part of this adventure is adapted directly from the sample dungeon included in D&D Supplement II: Blackmoor in 1975, the first adventure ever published for an RPG, set in the first campaign world specifically created for a fantasy RPG.  Sci fi elements from other worlds were a part of D&D from the very beginning.

September 12, 2014   88 notes
A dramatic, probably mismatched aerial combat.  (Jeff Easley, from the 7th and later printings of the 1st ed AD&D Monster Manual, TSR, ca 1985-89.  Image via The Acaeum.)

A dramatic, probably mismatched aerial combat.  (Jeff Easley, from the 7th and later printings of the 1st ed AD&D Monster Manual, TSR, ca 1985-89.  Image via The Acaeum.)

September 11, 2014   115 notes
An intellect devourer is a highly intelligent, chaotic evil, man-sized creature with a body that somewhat resembles a brain.  It attacks with its 4 great claws and its psionic ability.  It is nearly impossible to kill by most regular or magical means, but is vulnerable to psionic attack.  (Dave Trampier from the AD&D Monster Manual, TSR, 1977.)
[[MORE]]
Wizards previewed a PDF of the intellect devourer from the 5th ed Monster Manual this week, with a post on the Wizards D&D site detailing the creature’s publication history and a link from the official D&D Tumblr (you know there’s an official D&D Tumblr, right?).
The I.D. is now an actual walking brain, a “tiny” sized creature, created by an illithid who removed the brain from a victim instead of eating it, then modified it into the mind flayer’s version of a hunting dog.  Its mode of attack includes destroying a victim’s brain and inserting itself in the skull to impersonate the host.
Pros:  The new art looks a lot like Trampier’s version, despite the size change.  The description requires no psionic rules, which I never liked to use and won’t miss.  The relationship with the illithids is interesting and fits both creatures’ roles in the Underdark.  Con:  The main attack form is still a nearly instant death effect, which I try to avoid using as a DM in a campaign game.
[[MORE]]

An intellect devourer is a highly intelligent, chaotic evil, man-sized creature with a body that somewhat resembles a brain.  It attacks with its 4 great claws and its psionic ability.  It is nearly impossible to kill by most regular or magical means, but is vulnerable to psionic attack.  (Dave Trampier from the AD&D Monster Manual, TSR, 1977.)

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September 10, 2014   63 notes
"The lonely town of Northending was built centuries ago on the north face of a large mountain."  (Bob Walters from AD&D module R3: The Egg of the Phoenix by Frank Mentzer, TSR/RPGA 1983.)

"The lonely town of Northending was built centuries ago on the north face of a large mountain."  (Bob Walters from AD&D module R3: The Egg of the Phoenix by Frank Mentzer, TSR/RPGA 1983.)

September 10, 2014   99 notes
Standard dungeon corridors and odd spaces, from “Mapping from Square One, Part II” by Frank Mentzer, Polyhedron No. 11, TSR/RPGA, 1983.

Standard dungeon corridors and odd spaces, from “Mapping from Square One, Part II” by Frank Mentzer, Polyhedron No. 11, TSR/RPGA, 1983.

September 9, 2014   39 notes
mana-junkie:

Three 20’s in a row!

#dicepraising ?  #dicebrag ?  The happy opposite of dice shaming.

mana-junkie:

Three 20’s in a row!

#dicepraising ? #dicebrag ? The happy opposite of dice shaming.