July 24, 2014   86 notes
Beowulf sails for Heorot Hall.  (Roger Raupp from “Three cheers for Beowulf, Different portraits of the legendary hero”, Dragon magazine No. 85, May 1984.)

Beowulf sails for Heorot Hall.  (Roger Raupp from “Three cheers for Beowulf, Different portraits of the legendary hero”, Dragon magazine No. 85, May 1984.)

July 23, 2014   43 notes
The minotaur of the Caves of Chaos with his mail coat and spear.  (Erol Otus from the early printings of D&D module B2: The Keep on the Borderlands, TSR, 1980.)  This was replaced in later printings with Bill Willingham’s version and the text was changed to update his stats, reduce his # of attacks and increase his spear damage.

The minotaur of the Caves of Chaos with his mail coat and spear.  (Erol Otus from the early printings of D&D module B2: The Keep on the Borderlands, TSR, 1980.)  This was replaced in later printings with Bill Willingham’s version and the text was changed to update his stats, reduce his # of attacks and increase his spear damage.

July 22, 2014   145 notes
terezisfineassbooty:

this is the box of dice I have to sort

So sparkly …I kind of want to dive into this box the way most people want to lay on a bed of money.

terezisfineassbooty:

this is the box of dice I have to sort

So sparkly …I kind of want to dive into this box the way most people want to lay on a bed of money.

(via writeinwhite)

July 22, 2014   44 notes
July 22, 2014   371 notes
Queen Hildeburh challenges a Valkyrie to combat.  (Lora Louise Freeland, from “Valkyrie Settlement” by Susan Shwartz, story inspired by a character referenced in Beowulf, Dragon magazine No. 85, May 1984.) 

Queen Hildeburh challenges a Valkyrie to combat.  (Lora Louise Freeland, from “Valkyrie Settlement” by Susan Shwartz, story inspired by a character referenced in Beowulf, Dragon magazine No. 85, May 1984.) 

July 21, 2014   75 notes
"The Big Stash" by Keith Parkinson features a group of dwarves led by a cleric of Thor.  (Dragon magazine No. 129, January 1988.)

"The Big Stash" by Keith Parkinson features a group of dwarves led by a cleric of Thor.  (Dragon magazine No. 129, January 1988.)

July 20, 2014   1 note

(I never did like how tall I made that Arch of the Warrior Maidens picture, so I went back and shrunk it to fit the screen better.)

July 20, 2014   89 notes
oldschoolfrp:

Thumbs-up for the Arch of the Warrior Maidens.  (Jim Holloway, from D&D module B4: The Lost City, written by Tom Moldvay, TSR, 1982.)

When new followers go back many pages liking or reblogging every post.

oldschoolfrp:

Thumbs-up for the Arch of the Warrior Maidens.  (Jim Holloway, from D&D module B4: The Lost City, written by Tom Moldvay, TSR, 1982.)

When new followers go back many pages liking or reblogging every post.

July 19, 2014   132 notes
Animated skeletons often lurk near graveyards, dungeons, or other deserted places.  (From the Moldvay D&D Basic Rulebook, TSR, 1981.)

Animated skeletons often lurk near graveyards, dungeons, or other deserted places.  (From the Moldvay D&D Basic Rulebook, TSR, 1981.)

July 18, 2014   78 notes
"Most communities view poisoning and poisons as highly undesirable…"  (Probably by Dave Trampier, from AD&D Players Handbook, written by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1978.)

"Most communities view poisoning and poisons as highly undesirable…"  (Probably by Dave Trampier, from AD&D Players Handbook, written by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1978.)

July 17, 2014   89 notes
"Ixitxachitl are a race of intelligent rays which dwell in shallow tropical seas."  Ixitxachitl society includes evil clerics of up to level 8 ability, giving them access to level 4 clerical spells.  With a ray’s ability to swim undetected in very shallow water, under small boats or just below the surf at the edge of a beach, they can interfere with human coastal settlements and even have limited access to nearby locations on land they flood with raise water (reverse of lower water spell).  They can animate dead to send skeletons and zombies marching out of the sea, limited only by the number of shipwrecks in the area.  (Illustration by Dave Trampier, I believe, AD&D Monster Manual, TSR, 1977.)

"Ixitxachitl are a race of intelligent rays which dwell in shallow tropical seas."  Ixitxachitl society includes evil clerics of up to level 8 ability, giving them access to level 4 clerical spells.  With a ray’s ability to swim undetected in very shallow water, under small boats or just below the surf at the edge of a beach, they can interfere with human coastal settlements and even have limited access to nearby locations on land they flood with raise water (reverse of lower water spell).  They can animate dead to send skeletons and zombies marching out of the sea, limited only by the number of shipwrecks in the area.  (Illustration by Dave Trampier, I believe, AD&D Monster Manual, TSR, 1977.)

July 16, 2014   12 notes

dudefella:

oldschoolfrp:

syringesin replied to your post“I spent years saying O-tee-ugg with 3 syllables.  Changing is hard….”
AH-TEE-yug is how I pronounce it. But how do you (or anyone) pronounce “Ixitxachitl”?
Exactly like it’s spelled.  They are average to high intelligence so you can try to speak to one in Nahuatl, but keep your atlatl ready because they are chaotic evil.
(Mentzer says “ik-ZIT-za-chit-ul”.)

The [x] in Nahuatl transcription represents the sound most English speakers make when they see [sh]. The [ch] represents the sound that starts words like children and chipper. The [tl] represents a sound not present in English, the voiceless alveolar lateral fricative, which most English speakers reproduce pretty much like it looks on the page.

Those vowels are from a Spanish transcription, so pronounce them like Spanish or Latin vowels. Also, Wikipedia says Nahuatl usually stresses the second-to-last vowel of a word keeping in mind that the [tl] is not a vowel sound, the stress would go on the SHACH.

An American English transcription of the pronunciation would look like:

eesh-eet-SHOTCH-eetle

This sounds right to me, though my practical Nahuatl is mostly limited to saying atlatl a lot.

July 16, 2014   11 notes
How the hell would an atlatl help?
I think an atlat could help a littl bitl.  An ixitxachitl is an intelligent ray that can swim in shallow watl.  Shooting from land, I would give you -4 to hitl.  But if you also were underwatl then no, you wouldn’t be able to hit shitl.
July 16, 2014   12 notes
AH-TEE-yug is how I pronounce it. But how do you (or anyone) pronounce “Ixitxachitl”?
Exactly like it’s spelled.  They are average to high intelligence so you can try to speak to one in Nahuatl, but keep your atlatl ready because they are chaotic evil.
(Mentzer says “ik-ZIT-za-chit-ul”.)
July 16, 2014   10 notes

I spent years saying O-tee-ugg with 3 syllables.  Changing is hard.  There’s probably an argument to be made that words like ‘otyugh' would be pronounced differently in different languages and dialects anyway.  Most people would lucky to have time to say “There's something moving under all this trash” before they got pulled under, leaving no time for thorough study and naming of the beast.  Which reminds me —

Because the otyugh’s stats first appeared in the Monster Manual in December of 1977, and because it is said to lurk with only its sensory organ protruding above a pile of offal, ready to attack with tentacles, it seems possible that it might have been inspired by the Star Wars trash compactor monster (dianoga).