September 1, 2014   68 notes
Keep your henchmen loyal by equipping them well, rewarding them fairly, giving them Labor Day off, crediting their artwork, and not always pushing them up front with the ten foot pole as trap detectors.  (From the AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide, TSR, 1979.  Unsigned; could be David Sutherland’s faces and shoulder heraldry, but not his usual style of mail.)

Keep your henchmen loyal by equipping them well, rewarding them fairly, giving them Labor Day off, crediting their artwork, and not always pushing them up front with the ten foot pole as trap detectors.  (From the AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide, TSR, 1979.  Unsigned; could be David Sutherland’s faces and shoulder heraldry, but not his usual style of mail.)

August 31, 2014   112 notes
This 1981 ad for TSR’s Dragon Dice* touts the blister pack as a “pocket-sized carrying case” and grandly promises “a special die marker” (it’s a wax crayon).  Of more historic significance is the inclusion of both a d10 and a d20 that the ad claims is “the only die of the market numerically labeled 1-20”.
It was later that we started using two different colored d10s to roll d%, then later still after many arguments about which die to read first that we finally got dedicated percentile dice with a tens place die labeled 10-00.
Image via Grognardia, where James Maliszewski recalls 1981 as the first year he saw a die marked 1-20.
(*Not to be confused with TSR’s collectible dice game “Dragon Dice” introduced in 1995.)

This 1981 ad for TSR’s Dragon Dice* touts the blister pack as a “pocket-sized carrying case” and grandly promises “a special die marker” (it’s a wax crayon).  Of more historic significance is the inclusion of both a d10 and a d20 that the ad claims is “the only die of the market numerically labeled 1-20”.

It was later that we started using two different colored d10s to roll d%, then later still after many arguments about which die to read first that we finally got dedicated percentile dice with a tens place die labeled 10-00.

Image via Grognardia, where James Maliszewski recalls 1981 as the first year he saw a die marked 1-20.

(*Not to be confused with TSR’s collectible dice game “Dragon Dice” introduced in 1995.)

August 31, 2014   48 notes
These are some of the old dice that saw action on our table yesterday.  I’m pretty sure I painted or inked the red and white numbers on the purple gem and black d20s.  Both are numbered 0-9 twice, so I read white as 1-10 and red as 11-20.
The purple gem die is a GameScience d20, identifiable by a “TM” and “G” on the “+1” face.  It is a sort of transition style, marked “0-9” and “0+” through “9+”, so even if you don’t ink it in 2 colors you can read all of the “+” digits as 11-20.
The yellowed die marked 1-20 may date from around 1981.  That style didn’t appear until enough people started using true d10s that they no longer needed to use their d20 as their d10, d20, and d%.

These are some of the old dice that saw action on our table yesterday.  I’m pretty sure I painted or inked the red and white numbers on the purple gem and black d20s.  Both are numbered 0-9 twice, so I read white as 1-10 and red as 11-20.

The purple gem die is a GameScience d20, identifiable by a “TM” and “G” on the “+1” face.  It is a sort of transition style, marked “0-9” and “0+” through “9+”, so even if you don’t ink it in 2 colors you can read all of the “+” digits as 11-20.

The yellowed die marked 1-20 may date from around 1981.  That style didn’t appear until enough people started using true d10s that they no longer needed to use their d20 as their d10, d20, and d%.

August 31, 2014   246 notes
sonofdysonsphere:

oldschoolfrp:

Dice.  (AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1979.)

WHERES THE D10???

In this picture it’s the d20, which probably was numbered 0-9 twice.  The true d10 did exist at this time, but most of us had not seen one yet.  Gygax wrote in the DMG that “Non-platonic solid-shaped dice are available in some places.  The most common of these is a ten-sided die numbered 0-9.”
There seems to be dispute about its first appearance, but the true d10 didn’t become widely available until around late 1979 through 1980.  The popularity of percentile mechanic games soon exploded.
Games using d10 or percentile mechanics go back earlier in the 1970s, and probably into antiquity, with the d20s numbered 0-9 or 1-10.  To read a d20 as 1-20 you had to hand color one side of the die yourself to mark when to add 10, or roll a d6 as a “high-low” indicator.
I still think of the d10 as a recent addition to the original five.

sonofdysonsphere:

oldschoolfrp:

Dice.  (AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1979.)

WHERES THE D10???

In this picture it’s the d20, which probably was numbered 0-9 twice.  The true d10 did exist at this time, but most of us had not seen one yet.  Gygax wrote in the DMG that “Non-platonic solid-shaped dice are available in some places.  The most common of these is a ten-sided die numbered 0-9.”

There seems to be dispute about its first appearance, but the true d10 didn’t become widely available until around late 1979 through 1980.  The popularity of percentile mechanic games soon exploded.

Games using d10 or percentile mechanics go back earlier in the 1970s, and probably into antiquity, with the d20s numbered 0-9 or 1-10.  To read a d20 as 1-20 you had to hand color one side of the die yourself to mark when to add 10, or roll a d6 as a “high-low” indicator.

I still think of the d10 as a recent addition to the original five.

August 31, 2014   53 notes
Half-orcs with halberds guard the temple of Gruumsh, beneath the one-eyed gaze of his enormous statue.  (Bill Willingham from AD&D module A1: Slave Pits of the Undercity, by David Cook, TSR, 1980.)

Half-orcs with halberds guard the temple of Gruumsh, beneath the one-eyed gaze of his enormous statue.  (Bill Willingham from AD&D module A1: Slave Pits of the Undercity, by David Cook, TSR, 1980.)

August 30, 2014   74 notes
X is for X-Ray Beast, a large one-eyed hippo that can see through walls, is immune to fire, and whose gaze causes 3d6 of radiation damage up to 20 feet.  (Carol Rode illus, monster created by Dave Hargrave, from All the Worlds’ Monsters, Chaosium, 1977.)

X is for X-Ray Beast, a large one-eyed hippo that can see through walls, is immune to fire, and whose gaze causes 3d6 of radiation damage up to 20 feet.  (Carol Rode illus, monster created by Dave Hargrave, from All the Worlds’ Monsters, Chaosium, 1977.)

August 30, 2014   10 notes

@scarabattoli said: Do you mean that in old D&D you could KILL DEATH and loot his/her body?

I’m not sure whether the Coachman of Death was The Death, the main incarnation of Death, in Roger Harvey’s campaign .  He’s described as “an undead human wearing a black, monk-like robe,” so perhaps he’s a malignamt spirit cosplaying as Death.  He’s still pretty powerful with 10 HD, accompanied by 6 black pegasi with paralyzing breath.

Of course the presentation of stats in AD&D Deities & Demigods convinced most players they could kill major gods or their avatars and loot their unique artifacts.

August 30, 2014   49 notes
The coachman of death seeks to turn one party member into a zombie.  His treasure is his robe of fear.  (Carol Rode illus, created by Roger Harvey, from All the Worlds’ Monsters, Chaosium, 1977.)

The coachman of death seeks to turn one party member into a zombie.  His treasure is his robe of fear.  (Carol Rode illus, created by Roger Harvey, from All the Worlds’ Monsters, Chaosium, 1977.)

August 29, 2014   246 notes
Dice.  (AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1979.)

Dice.  (AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1979.)

August 29, 2014   71 notes
My friend’s mom thought D&D was about studying witchcraft, but really we were studying math, probability, medians and means, in order to learn the right way to read a d4 and a d8 to simulate a d32 with a linear curve.  (From Gary Gygax’s AD&D Dungeon Masters Guide, TSR, 1979.)

My friend’s mom thought D&D was about studying witchcraft, but really we were studying math, probability, medians and means, in order to learn the right way to read a d4 and a d8 to simulate a d32 with a linear curve.  (From Gary Gygax’s AD&D Dungeon Masters Guide, TSR, 1979.)

August 29, 2014   80 notes
Treasure in the dust.  (Diesel from the AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide, TSR, 1979.)

Treasure in the dust.  (Diesel from the AD&D Dungeons Masters Guide, TSR, 1979.)

August 28, 2014   30 notes
Anthropomorphic cats in space!  Traveller Alien Module 1: Aslan, cover by David Deitrick, GDW, 1984.

Anthropomorphic cats in space!  Traveller Alien Module 1: Aslan, cover by David Deitrick, GDW, 1984.

August 27, 2014   53 notes
The fortified city of Erelhei-Cinlu, stronghold of the Dark Elvenfolk, rises above a forest of giant lichens and fungi.  (Dave Trampier from AD&D module D3: Vault of the Drow, by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1978 & 1980.)

The fortified city of Erelhei-Cinlu, stronghold of the Dark Elvenfolk, rises above a forest of giant lichens and fungi.  (Dave Trampier from AD&D module D3: Vault of the Drow, by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1978 & 1980.)

August 27, 2014   59 notes
The view upon entering the Vault of the Drow, a domed fault over 6 miles long, with the Black Tower guarding the road ahead.  (Dave Trampier from AD&D module D3: Vault of the Drow, by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1978 & 1980.)

The view upon entering the Vault of the Drow, a domed fault over 6 miles long, with the Black Tower guarding the road ahead.  (Dave Trampier from AD&D module D3: Vault of the Drow, by Gary Gygax, TSR, 1978 & 1980.)

August 26, 2014   38 notes
Something lurks behind the doughty halfling warrior.  (Bill Willingham from AD&D module S2: White Plume Mountain by Lawrence Schick, TSR, fourth and later printings 1980-81.)  The originial 1979 printing of S2 was a slim 12 pages, including the players’ handout.  Later printings were stretched to 16 pages by the addition of full-page and half-page art.

Something lurks behind the doughty halfling warrior.  (Bill Willingham from AD&D module S2: White Plume Mountain by Lawrence Schick, TSR, fourth and later printings 1980-81.)  The originial 1979 printing of S2 was a slim 12 pages, including the players’ handout.  Later printings were stretched to 16 pages by the addition of full-page and half-page art.